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In most markets, it's customary for sellers to work on their home until it's in top condition before listing it for sale. But sometimes sellers need to offload their home without making those cosmetic touch-ups -- or major repairs -- for one reason or another. There's no shame in selling a house as-is, but when you have a fixer-upper on your hands that you need to sell, you should be aware of how to do it in a way that nets you the best dollar amount possible while avoiding lingering on the market (unless that's your plan, of course). Read More

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Lots of us enjoy whiling away an hour or three watching those shows on HGTV that involve an attractive couple buying a house, spending what seems like a few hours (or days) making some repairs and upgrades here and there, then either moving into the home of their dreams or flipping it for some serious cash profit. And if you're going to fantasize about some aspect of homeownership, you could do a lot worse than creating your own private castles in the clouds that you help build and finish all on your own. Read More

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When moving out of a primary residence, most homeowners make the obvious decision to sell their current property. But is that really the best choice for you? The answer, of course, depends on many factors -- your current financial and housing situation, the real estate and rental market where you live, and several others that can add up to help you make a decision about what to do. Read More

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The final walk-through is an exciting time for buyers: The house is almost yours! It can be tempting to spend the time set aside for the walk-through mentally planning where you'll place your furniture and hang your wall art -- but there are some things you should make time to check before you leave the walk-through and get ready to close. Otherwise, you might find yourself unpleasantly surprised once the keys are handed over and the seller is no longer responsible for the property. Read More

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When seeking new and different lead-generation strategies, you’ve probably come across the recommendation to host a real estate seminar for potential clients. It’s a common way for real estate agents to get their names and brands out into the community, meet possible buyers and sellers, and explain how a qualified agent can smooth the real estate process. If you’ve ever tried to create a seminar, though, you know that to craft a good one, you need to invest quite a bit of time and possibly some money into the effort. Read More

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There's one question that real estate agents get asked all the time: "How's the market?" It's a difficult question to answer because the most accurate response depends on a variety of factors -- whether you're a buyer or a seller; what price point is most relevant to your particular case (the luxury market behaves very differently than the entry-level market); the state, metro area, neighborhood, and even the street where you're looking to buy or sell; how quickly you want to close the transaction -- you get the idea. Read More

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An open house can be an ideal way to introduce a bulk of buyers to the property you're hoping to sell them, and done right, an open house can sometimes generate multiple offers. The key, though, is "done right" -- not every open house is going to be a buyer's bonanza, and not every open house showcases a home at its highest potential. You want buyers walking in to feel welcome and for the house to be presented as at least a little bit of a party venue, so buyers can imagine themselves hosting their own event for friends and family in the home. Read More

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If you've never bought a house before, then you might not be familiar with closing costs -- and if you've never sold a house before, then you may be unaware that sellers have to shoulder some closing costs of their own. For buyers, closing costs encompass lender fees, title company fees, prepaid costs, and a handful of miscellaneous components that could be classified under more than one category; for sellers, closing costs typically include agent fees and some title fees, too. Read More

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When you buy a home in a rural area, it's much more of a lifestyle decision than deciding to settle down in a city or even close to a city. And if you aren't deeply familiar with the place where you want to move, then you'll need to research what it's really like to live there and decide whether it's for you. Read More

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Buying a home anywhere feels like a huge step, but getting settled in the suburbs can seem especially momentous for any household. After all, traditionally, suburbs were for establishing a place in the community and raising a family, where you can put down roots and grow a life. Where you might plan to stay in your city home for just three to five years, a home in the suburbs could be the place where you retire. Read More